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Lies, Will Power, and Curiosity

the Emergence Explorer

Questions for the Week of May 14, 2007






Emergence Character Type Babies 9-AI-2


This Week's Questions


[posed by Stanley L. and Ollie H.]
  • To what degree does a long standing habit of relying on Momentum Learning kill one's natural curiosity?
  • To what degree does a long standing habit of seeking Emergent Learning alter one's ability to run on will power?
  • Does a tendency toward high average inner visual abilities create a bias toward confabulation?

Do you know?



[Question 1] To what degree does a long standing habit of relying on Momentum Learning kill one's natural curiosity?
[Answer] My first thoughts? I'm not sure that a long standing habit of relying on Momentum Learning kills any of one's natural curiosity. What I can say is this though. Most emergences occur in people while they are in the momentum of some learning process. Thus Momentum Learning is an essential part of being in the right state of mind to learn. At least for a student who is deliberately trying to learn.

What about students who learn without first being in the momentum of some learning process? In truth, this does sometimes happen. People can and do sometimes learn by accident. Right place at the right time so to speak. However, in general, if you want to learn something, relying on Momentum Learning is essential.

If Momentum Learning does not kill one's natural curiosity, then what does?

Not facing Dead Stops. In fact, more than any other state in the cycle of learning, Dead Stops drain one's desire to learn. Moreover, if you stay in one for a long enough time, this can even poison your overall love of learning; for days, for weeks, even lifetimes. How? By burying one's natural curiosity beneath tons of dreadfully heavy frustration and failure.

All this said, a better question to ask might be, how does relying on Momentum Learning affect one's levels of curiosity? Here, my answer would depend on how this momentum is occurring. From observing an interesting teacher and from hearing interesting teaching stories? Great. From having to memorize endlessly boring lists of mindless, statistical factoids? Not good. Thus while Momentum Learning in and of itself is a good thing to work towards in the learning process, trying to attain this momentum in a Layer Two format can indeed kill one's natural curiosity. As can any Layer Two activity if done for a long enough time. Learning and otherwise.

[Question 2] To what degree does a long standing habit of seeking Emergent Learning alter one's ability to run on will power?
[Answer]
Anything which involves the nature of will power is an extremely interesting topic. Will power is not a quality within human nature that's easy to quantify, that's for sure. For the sake of answering this question then, I'll need to simplify it down to those situations wherein people need to do what I call, "damage control." In essence, "doing damage control" means using one's mind and will to override one's natural urges to do the wrong thing.

So to what degree does a long standing habit of seeking Emergent Learning alter one's ability to manage life by doing damage control? I'd say that it both helps and hinders. Helps because it decreases the number of situations wherein you need to rely on will power in order to not do the wrong thing. And hinders because it makes you aware of how needing to do damage control in order to do the right thing is so much harder in the long run than using your will to work toward emergences.

How exactly does a long standing habit of seeking Emergent Learning decreases the number of situations wherein one needs to use will power? Good question. The answer. With every emergence, people become more naturally able to be themselves. Without effort and with no will power whatsoever. In effect, the ability to do the right thing simply by being themselves is what emerges in people. When this happens, living life becomes synonymous with beings oneself. at least in that one area of life. Thus in this life area, the number of situations wherein you need will power decreases markedly.

And those cases wherein a long standing habit of seeking Emergent Learning hinders one's ability to run on will power? To be honest, from the first time you have an emergence by choice, doing this becomes the more desirable thing to do and will power the second best. This means, while you can still choose to do damage control at times, knowing you are doing it makes it even harder to do.

In the end then, like all things fractal, there is an up side and a down to Emergent Learning. An easy side and a hard side. There is not however a good side and a bad. Only the two natural sides of each coin. Each one pushing you toward health, healing, and being your natural self.

[Question 3] Does it take more storage capacity in the mind to store Emergent Learning versus Momentum Learning?
[Answer]
In order to answer this question, I'll need to use what many experts now consider to be an outdated metaphor for mental processing. You know. The one wherein there are two mental work spaces, one temporary, and one permanent. Know that while there is indeed much more to be said about how the mind works, with regard to memory, there is still much we can learn from using this metaphor. At least as far as understanding the basics of how the mind works.

Let's begin by defining the meaning of these two types of storage space, temporary, and permanent, starting with the word permanent. What does it mean to say that something is being stored in permanent memory?

First, realize what the word does not mean. It does not mean permanent in the sense of being "unchangeable." Thus while learning to ride a bike gets stored in the mind as indefinitely accessible learning, there is always the possibility to add to this permanent memory things like better ways to go around a corner or improved methods of braking. Moreover, what we add we may store in either temporary or permanent memory or both.

What then is temporary memory? Again, let's begin with what it does not mean. It does not mean that what we store in temporary memory goes away as soon as we stop thinking about it. Although it might. It means that when the momentum of what we are storing in temporary memory stops, our ability to access this learning from our temporary workspace fades very quickly.

What this all boils down to then is that what we store in temporary memory remains there only as long as the momentum of the activity lasts, while what we store in permanent memory will last forever. On the other hand, while this learning does become a permanent part of our memory, it can also at any time be amended and adjusted simply by adding either temporary or permanent information or both.

As to your question, does it take more storage capacity to store Emergent Learning versus Momentum Learning, I'd say it's probably an apples and oranges question. Moreover, to see why I am saying this, consider this. Consider the two ways in which we can store graphic designs in a computer; as raster drawings, and as vector drawings.

Now for those who are unfamiliar with how these two kinds of drawings differ, raster drawings are made up of many thousands of dots, while vector drawings are made up of only the instructions as to how to draw this drawing with lines and colors. What this boils down to is that because you are only storing instructions and not the whole drawing, the space required to store vector drawings is many thousands of times less than the space required to store raster drawings.

How does this apply to memory? Because we humans learn by discovering the fractal nature of things, the things stored in our permanent memory probably more resemble vector drawings than raster drawings; highly efficient fractal patterns rather than tons of discrete data details.

Conversely, I'd guess that things we hold in temporary memory probably more resemble raster drawings whose underlying fractal nature we have yet to discover. Thus it probably takes an incredible amount of storage space to hold these pre fractal designs in memory, as storing every single dot requires a heck of a lot of space. Very inefficient to say the least.

[Question 4] Does a tendency toward high average inner visual abilities create a bias toward confabulation?
[Answer]
No. However, a tendency toward high average inner visual abilities does create an above average ability to lie once a person decides to do it. Even here though, this does not mean the person will do it. Only that the person can do it once he or she decides.

[Question 5] What makes it so difficult to recognize and cater to needs consistently?
[Answer]
Here again, like will power, this is an incredibly complex question with an incredibly simple way to answer it. What makes it hard to recognize needs? Blocks. And what makes Blocks? Being startled while hyperaware.

What this means is that we all have two groups of needs. The needs we can by nature see with ease, and the needs which we see only indirectly, because we see symptoms. With the needs we easily see, we need use no will power whatsoever to meet them. We meet these needs because it is in us to meet these needs, naturally and without much effort. With the needs we see only indirectly though, we need tons of logic and will power as well as outside help in order to meet these needs. Things like gyms and physical trainers and friends encouragements to stay on the diet.

So what makes it so difficult to recognize and cater to needs consistently? Blocked needs. The needs we cannot by nature see. Thus while we all have needs we regularly meet with ease, we also all have needs we needs to be reminded to meet. Why? Because we simply do not think about them on our own.


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