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Emergence Personality Theory
(formerly called the Layers of Aloneness)

A Quick Summary



emergence therapy psychological wounds

Main Points on This Quick List



[1] Originally Emergence Personality Theory was called The Layers of Aloneness.
This was based on the idea that the theory is based on two ideas; (1) that resolving aloneness is the primary drive in human nature, and (2) that human nature is organized in layers which describe the degree to which people experience this drive.
[2] The Layers of Aloneness divides human nature into a succession of ten nested fractal layers.
Each of these layers describes "the degree to which a person experiences aloneness."
[3] There are only three layers wherein people experience "no aloneness" Layers 1, 9, and 10.
[4] Of these three "no aloneness" experiences, the least personal occur in Layer 1, the layer of "personal non-existence." Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly disconnected from the Universe (from all else) and so, they are alone but unaware of their aloneness.
[5] The most personal "no aloneness" experiences occur, then, in Layer 10, the layer of "The Great Unknown," otherwise known as the layer of "divine us."
Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly connected to the Universe (to all else) and so, they are not alone.
[6] The second most personal "no aloneness" experiences occur, then, in Layer 9, the layer of " personal us."
Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly connected to someone else and so, they are not alone.
[7] The Layers of Aloneness assumes the first layers of personality to emerge are layers 9, 8, and 7; further, that these layers emerge in this order during the birth process.
These layers are: layer 9: the layer of "personal us"; layer 8: the layer of "aloneness," and layer 7: the layer of "need" (character types, social priorities, etc.).
[8] The focus of Emergence as a Therapy is on healing peoples' natures, not just their thinking or behaviors.
The Layers of Aloneness
, by describing human nature, guides and defines Emergence as a Therapy.

Words and Phrases to Pay Attention To


(they've been redefined to reflect Emergence Personality Theory)
aloneness as a drive, connection as what resolves this drive, need as what defines this drive, the ten Layers of Aloneness, personal non-existence, the Great Unknown

9 emergence character type babies


Quick List With Examples



[1] The Layers of Aloneness is a theory of human personality. This theory is based on two ideas; (1)that resolving aloneness is the primary drive in human nature, and (2) that human nature is organized in layers which describe the degree to which people experience this drive.

  • All theories of personality assume a drive or motive, some, more than one. The Layers of Aloneness assumes one drive, the need to resolve one's feelings of aloneness, where aloneness is defined as "the pain resulting from the loss of connection to another; the experience of leaving an "us" state.
  • The layers themselves then describe the varying degrees to which people experience this pain (aloneness), along with the varying strategies people employ to resolve this pain.

[2] The Layers of Aloneness divides human nature into a succession of ten layers . These layers describe "the degree to which a person experiences aloneness."

  • As has been said, these ten layers describe the varying degrees to which people experience the state of aloneness. This style of organization, "layers," is taken from what is seen as one of the best mirrors of human personality; computer operating systems. Here, examples would be: MS DOS, Windows 98, Mac OS X, etc. Further, regardless of their differences, these operating systems all share an essential feature: they were all created in a sequence of layers which together, connect the inside world (the physical machine) to the outside world (the computer operator.)
  • As a theory then, the Layers of Aloneness very much parallels computer operating systems in that it simply describes the connections between the inside world (the person) and the outside world (other than the person).

[3] There are only three layers in which people experience "no aloneness " Layers 1, 9, and 10.

  • These three layers are: layer 1, the layer of "personal non-existence," layer 9, the layer of "personal us," and layer 10, the layer of "divine us," otherwise known as the layer of "The Great Unknown."
  • The experience of "no aloneness" has four essential qualities: (1) no needs, (2) no suffering, (3) no blame, and (4) no "why questions."
  • Expressed as a function of "needs," while in these three layers and only while in these three layers, people experience no needs. For example, when people perform work in a state of "no aloneness," they experience the work as effortless, not as difficult.
  • Expressed as a function of "suffering," while in these three layers and only while in these three layers, since people experience no needs, they experience no suffering. For example, when people experience emotionally laden life experiences like illness in a state of "no aloneness," they experience the illness as normal, not as pathology.
  • Expressed as a function of "blame," while in these three layers and only while in these three layers, since people experience no "why questions," they experience no blame. For example, when people experience an infidelity, they usually spend most of their energies on blaming rather than on healing. This diverts much needed energies and in some cases, prevents the healing from even beginning.
  • Expressed as a function of "reason," while in these three layers and only while in these three layers, since people experience no suffering, they experience no "why questions." For example, people who experience the loss of a job while in a state of "no aloneness" quickly heal and focus on their next job, not on why they lost this job. This frees up a great deal of energy normally wasted on trying to understand why the event occurred. This also redirects energies usually focused on preventing a reoccurrence of this type of event.
  • In all other layers (layers 2 through 8), people do experience varying levels of aloneness and thus, they also experience the four qualities of aloneness: (1) needs, (2) suffering, (3) blame and (4)"why questions."

[4] Of these three "no aloneness" experiences, the least personal occur in Layer 1, the layer of "personal non-existence ." Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly disconnected from the Universe (from all else) and so, they are alone but unaware of their aloneness.

  • Two thousand years ago, the Gnostics called this state, the "hylic" state. In essence, while in this state, people simply go about their lives focused on their daily tasks with little to no awareness of their inner life. Principle in this lack of awareness is a lack of awareness as to how alone they really are (how disconnected they are from the world and other beings), they experience few to no unmet needs, feel little to no suffering, ask few to no "why questions," and basically do not blame.
  • Unfortunately, while in this layer, because people feel little of anything personally unpleasant, they also have little to no motive to heal. Worse yet, these people often believe they have healed all they need to heal and so, mistake the lack of suffering for healing.

[5] The most personal "no aloneness" experiences occur, then, in Layer 10,the layer of "The Great Unknown," otherwise known as the "divine us." Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly connected to the Universe (to all else) and so, they are not alone.

  • Two thousand years ago, the Gnostics called this state, the "pneumatic" state. In essence, people in this state experience what the founders of the great philosophies and religions experienced; a profoundly deep connection to all that exists. It is through this connection that people gain access to the source of all great divine wisdom. It is also through this connection the one people experience in layer 9, that people have the ability to heal.
  • One way to understand this source of divine wisdom is to see it as the perspective people have access to while consciously aware of the differences between themselves and all else, including all other people. This perspective is the first part of what enables people to heal. In fact, this perspective is the first half of healing.

[6] The second most personal "no aloneness" experiences occur, then, in Layer 9, the layer of "personal us." Within this layer, people experience no aloneness because they are profoundly connected to someone else and so, they are not alone.

  • Also part of what the Gnostics called, the 'pneumatic state," in essence, people in this state experience what the founders of the great psychologies and political systems experienced; a profoundly deep connection to all other people. It is through this connection that people gain access to the source of all great personal wisdom.
  • One way to understand this source of personal wisdom is to see it as the perspective people have access to while consciously aware of the differences between themselves and all other people. This perspective is the second part of what enables people to heal. In fact, this perspective the second half of healing.

[7] The Layers of Aloneness assumes the first layers of personality to emerge are layers 9, 8, and 7; further, that these layers emerge in this order during the birth process. These layers are: layer 9: the layer of "personal us, layer 8: the layer of "aloneness,"and layer 7: the layer of "need" (character types).

  • The order in which these three layers emerge is 9, 8, 7. Thus the first layer to emerge is layer 9, the layer of "personal us."
  • This layer forms in the time preceding birth. During this time, a mother and baby are assumed to be a "two-that-are-one; in other words, very intimately connected. As such, this time is called the baby's "first relationship."
  • Layer 8, the layer of "aloneness," is the second layer to emerge. This layer forms in the moments of the birth experience.
  • Obviously, this experience, the move from the experience of layer 9, the layer of "personal us," to that of layer 8, the layer of "aloneness," is very painful. As such, this time is called, the baby's "first broken heart."
  • Experiencing this change, the difference between "the first relationship" and "the first broken heart," becomes the baby's "first perspective." Essentially, this first perspective forms a baby's first view of life, the view against which all other experiences will be measured and from which all personality will be formed. This means it is the experience from which all else; all thoughts, all feelings, and all behavior; emerges. Taken as a whole, these three inner responses combine to form all human motives, and this sum of three is referred to as "resolving aloneness."

  • Layer 7, then, the layer of "need," is the last of these first three layers to emerge. This layer forms out of the baby's now natural desire to avoid re-experiencing the first broken heart, and it is a compensation for not reconnecting. In essence, the birth experience alters the baby's nature in such a way as to make "needs" rather than "reconnecting" the perceived way to resolve aloneness. Thus, resolving "needs" rather then aloneness becomes the most basic, visible human motive.

[8] The focus of Emergence as a Therapy is on healing peoples' natures, not just their thinking or behaviors. The Layers of Aloneness, by describing human nature, guides and defines Emergence as a Therapy.

  • All current systems of personality assume that changes in behavior and understanding result in changes to a person's nature; thus, the current popularity of cognitive-behavioral therapies. Emergence as a Therapy sees these changes as the result of will controlling an unchanged nature, a process it calls, doing "damage control." Thus, because these peoples' natures remain essentially unchanged, any changes people make will require ongoing efforts to maintain.
  • Emergence as a Therapy assumes the opposite sequence; that changes in behavior and understanding result from changes to a person's nature. These changes literally alter the person's inner life and so, afterwards, changes in behavior and understanding occur with little to no effort. These new behaviors and understandings have simply become natural for the person.
  • Since behaviors and understandings which result from changes in a person's nature require little to no remedial effort to maintain, Emergence as a Therapy sees changes in a person's nature as the preferred way to change peoples' behavior and understanding.
  • Emergence Practitioners use their knowledge of The Layers of Aloneness to guide this healing process, the one in which peoples' behaviors and understanding become naturally different.
Want to know more? For an full length article on The Layers of Aloneness, click below.



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