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Matching Kids to Teachers
Part 3 - the Positively Biased Personality Tests

On Education and Learning



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Ever try to persuade your parents your teacher had it in for you? Did they not believe you or tell you to just grin and bear it? This week, in our ongoing weekly series on education and learning, we're going to take our first look at the Emergence Personality Theory based, Social Priority tests. This time, we're going to look at one of the twelve tests I've designed to assess older kids and adults. For instance, this test might be used to assess teachers.

social priority test example positive

Chapter Twenty Two

Alright, Already. Where Are The Tests!

Have you ever seen the 1931 Universal Studios version of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein? The scene toward the end wherein the townies arrive to kill the monster with clubs and pitch forks? Somewhere in the dark recesses of my mind, I picture myself awaiting a similar fate. Only in my case, it's at the hands of a group of fundamentalist educators, some armed with statistical pitch forks, some with wooden clubs notched with their alphabet-soup degrees. Not a pretty picture.

All kidding aside. Yes. It's time I show you the beef. Where are the blinkin' fractal tests, and why make such a big deal about these tests anyway? To see, we're going to take a look at a sample test. The one you see above, in fact. Know that in order for you to actually learn how these tests work, you're going to have to resist answering the questions for yourself. At least, until I finish explaining the testing process. Why? Because the validity of these tests rests, in large part, on how they are administered. Simply answering these questions will not result in a valid test.

Know, also, that the test you see above is not the only version of the test. Thus, while it is, indeed, a complete test, there are eleven other, equally valid tests. Why other tests? Mostly, because the test validity relies on that the person can answer spontaneously. No thinking. Just answers. Also, there are times wherein the first test results may not be conclusive. Taking a second test usually clears this up. And even a third test can be used, if need be.

Here, then, is what we'll be doing this week. One, we'll be examining at the various elements which make up these tests. Two, we'll be looking at what makes a valid test setting.

The Social Priority Test Elements

Let's start by looking at the elements which make up this test. Please note, the sample test you see above is a whole test. What I'm saying is, the entire test fits on a single page. How can this be? More important, how can such a simple test be enough to accurately match a student to a teacher?

How? Because this test measures the two most basic fractals of human personality; Character Type, and Social Priorities. These two qualities are first two levels of Emergence Personality Theory's, Layer 7. This part of our personalities is the last to get created by the birth separation-moment experience. It is the Layer we call, the Layer of Need. More on what this means as we go on.

Now looking at the sample test, notice that there are only two sections on this page; the upper, "Questions" section, and the lower, "Results" section. The Questions section is where we gather the Personality Data. The Results section is where we create the actual Personality Fractal. Now let's take a closer look at what is contained within these two sections. We'll start with the Questions section.

Begin by noticing that the Questions section contains four sub sections, each with it's own heading.

  • In the first sub section, there are six Social Priority questions. The answers to these questions become the raw data from which you'll later determine the order of the person's four Social Priorities.
  • In the second sub section, there are six pairs of Choice Icons. These icons correspond to the answers you got to the six Social Priority questions. Note that in each pair, you'll circle one icon and leave the other uncircled.
  • In the third sub section, there is a three column Answer Matrix, a kind of work sheet on which you boil down the six iconic answers into the person's four Social Priorities.
  • Finally, in the fourth sub section, there are three questions which help you to determine the person's Character Type.

Six Social Priority questions and three Character Type questions. Nine questions in all. How are these questions to be asked?

Someone trained in Emergence Eye Recognition must ask the person being tested the questions. In other words, the person being tested cannot simply read the questions to him or herself and expect valid results. The test validity relies on that there are two people present, a "guide" and an "explorer." Moreover, while the explorer need no prior exposure to the test process, the guide must be trained in how to properly coach the explorer through the test.

Herein lies one reason why such a simple test can be so concise. Human intervention. Know, however, that children as young as ten or eleven can be trained to be Social Priority Test guides. In fact, for some age groups, peer testing can improve the test validity, although adult to child testing can be equally valid.

Now let's look at the actual data gathering sequence.

Gathering the Personal Data

I would now ask that you imagine yourself sitting next to me, and that I am about to ask a high school history teacher the six social Priority test questions. I begin by offering her a few brief instructions, starting with that that I will be asking her a series of nine questions. Thus, the test will take no longer than a few minutes.

Next, I ask that she answer the questions without mentally considering them. I then add that I'm looking for her first impulse answer only. More important, that for the test to be valid, she needs to answer this way.

Lastly, I remind this teacher that all answers are "right" answers. In other words, there are no wrong answers. These questions are simply designed to determine a person's basic personality type. Nothing more.

Now I ask her the first question. In this case, I ask her, "Which would you rather be, comfortable or neat?"

In our sample test, the teacher answered, "comfortable." Thus, in the Choices column to the right of the questions, I'd circle the "C" icon; the little pink Comfort pillow.

Next question. "Would you rather be, smart or free?" In this case, our teacher answered, "free," so I'd circle the "F" icon; the little red Freedom butterfly.

Note that the way these questions are phrased, each question offers a choice between two answers, and that each pair of answers is separated by the word "or." Similarly, in the Choices column, next to each question, there are two icons, also separated by the word, "or." I mention this as it is important to know that the first of the two possible answers correlates to the left Choice icon. And so on.

Now I ask the third question. "Which would you rather be, pampered or tutored?" Our sample teacher said, "pampered"; the left answer. Thus we would again circle the left icon; the little pink Comfort pillow.

At this point, I ask her the remaining three questions, and in turn, circle the appropriate three Choice icons.

We now have answers to the six Social Priority questions, along with six circled icons, one for each of the six questions. In a moment, we'll transfer what we've marked in the Choices column to the left most column of the Answer Matrix. For now, we'll skip this part and first ask the teacher the three Character Type questions which are located in the sub section all the way to the right.

Here again, I remind the teacher to answer these questions without mentally considering them. Simply speak her first impulse. Now I ask her the first question. "Would you rather give or get?" "Get," she says. Without pause, I then ask her the second question. "Would you rather not give?" "No," she answers. I then ask her the third question, again without pausing. "Do you mind not getting?" "Yes," she answers.

Now notice what I've written in the boxes to the right of these three questions. "Get." "No, give." "Yes."

Creating the Personality Fractal

Now we're ready to create the Personality Fractal. We'll start by transferring what we've written in the Choices sub section to the Answer Matrix. Know that doing this can be a bit daunting at first. Don't panic. It's really easy once you get the hang of it.

Before we transfer any answers though, first notice that the Answer Matrix has three columns, a left column, a middle column, and a right column. Now notice that each column consists of six pairs of vertically stacked boxes. Twelve boxes in each column. Finally, know there are four possible letter answers we can transfer; C, N, U, and F. Each of these letters represents one of the four Social Priority icons; Comfort, Neatness, Understanding, and Freedom. Now we're ready to begin filling in the Answer Matrix.

Step One - Filling in the left most Answer Matrix column

Now let's begin to actually transfer the letters from the Choices sub section to the Answer Matrix. In this case, we'd begin by copying the letters from the first question over to the first pair of boxes in the Left Answer Matrix Column, beginning with the letter of the circled Choice icon, the letter "C." I'd write this letter in the top most box of the left Answer column. Then I'd record the letter of the first uncircled Choice icon in the box below this "C." In this case, I'd write the letter, "N."

Result. The upper most pair of boxes now holds "C" over "N."

Next, I'd do this same thing for the two letters of the second question. In this case, I'd record the letter "F" in the upper box, and the letter "U" in the lower box. Result. "F" over "U."

At this point, I'd transfer the remaining four pairs of Choice icons. In each case, I'd record the letter of the circled icon in the upper box, followed by the letter of the uncircled icon in the lower box.

Final result. Six vertical pairs of letters in the left Answer Matrix column. "C" over "N." "F" over "U." "C" over "U." "F" over "N." "U" over "N." And "C" over "F." We now have our twelve "raw data" letters, each pair of letters signifying a personal priority.

Step Two - Determining the person's First Social Priority

Now we'd begin to determine the actual personality matrix. How? By looking for the letter which appears on top three times. In this case, it's the letter, "C."

Our next step would be to then record these three pairs of letters in a horizontal row, beginning with transferring the second "C" on-top pair to the boxes next to the first "C" on-top pair. In this case, we'd transfer the "C" over "U" pair to boxes in the middle Answer Matrix column, right next to the "C" over "N."

Now cross out the "C" over "U" pair in the left column.

Now transfer the third "C" on-top pair to adjoining boxes in the right Answer Matrix column, this time writing "C" over "F" next to the "C" over "U" pair. Now cross out the "C" over "F" pair in the left Answer Matrix column.

At this point, you have a horizontal row of three pairs of answers; "C" over "N," "C" over "U," and "C" over "F." We now know that this person's normal first Social Priority is Comfort. Comfort is her priority over all the other choices. Thus, we can now circle the "C" in the right Answer Matrix column.

Now what?

Step Three - Determining the person's Second Social Priority

Now we'd determine the person's Second Social Priority. How? By looking for the letter which comes out on top twice in the left column. In this case, it's the letter, "F." Thus, we'd now transfer the second "F" on-top pair to the adjoining middle Answer Matrix boxes, the ones right next to the first "F" on-top pair. We'd then cross out the pair we just transferred, in this case, the "F" over "N" pair.

Now we know that this person's Second Social Priority is Freedom. To note this, write an "F" in the third column next to this pair of answers, and then circle it.

Step Four - Determining the person's Third and Fourth Social Priorities

Finally, we are left with the person's third and fourth Social Priorities. At this point, we should be able to see this simply by looking for the left column answer which has neither of the two already used Social Priorities in it. In this case, it is the "U" over "N" pair, which we would now transfer from the left Answer Matrix column to the right Answer Matrix column. We'd then circle this whole pair, meaning, both letters.

Step Five - Filling in the Results Section

Now locate the blank Personality Fractal in the lower right hand corner of the test, the object with two orangey column headings. Here is where we will record the person's Personality Fractal.

We'd begin by first writing the letter of the person's first Social Priority into the top right box. In this case, we'd write a "C." Next, we'd write the letter of the person's Second Social Priority in right column box just beneath the First Social Priority. In this case, we'd write an "F." Next, we'd transfer letters from the person's Third and Fourth Social Priorities into the third and fourth right column boxes.

The result? The column reads, C, F, U, N. This is the person's Social Priority list.

Finally, we'd transfer the three Character Type answers to the Results section left column. In this case, we'd circle the "Get," then the "Give."

Interpreting the Personality Fractal

So far, we've done a whole lot of work, all to simply enter nine pieces of information into this little orangey fractal. What does all this mean though? And what makes it a personality "fractal?"

To see, start by looking at the left column of this person's Personality Fractal, the Character Type column. In our present case, our teacher is a Character Type 3. By this, I mean, she is a "me then you." This means the most basic quality within her personality is that she first wants to "get," then wants to "give."

The question, of course, then becomes, what exactly does she want to "get then give" though?

To see, let's look at what we've written in the right column of the Personality Fractal. In this case, we've written, C, F, U, N. So what does this teacher want to get then give? Comfort. And she wants to give this "Freely"; her second Social Priority.

This means, she'd begin her classes by first noticing if she's comfortable in her classroom. Then she'll ask her kids if they're also comfortable. She would also welcome their input. Why? Because she resonates best with the group of kids who would also want to attend to their comfort first. The Comfort First students.

Once this was settled, she'd feel "free" to begin her lesson. How? By "freely" offering her lesson in a sensually focused way. For example, say this teacher was teaching about the middle ages. She might focus her lesson on how difficult life was for people back then, especially with regard to things like hard beds, cold food, no showers, and so on. She might also comment on how coarse the clothing was, or on how severe the winter's might have been, or on how caustic the soap was.

What makes this teacher's focus so important? The idea that if her class where filled with Comfort first students, they'd all be resonating with empathy. Even more important, they'd all be welling up with interest. Why? Because they'd all be picturing how life would have been for them if they lived back then. Comfort wise, that is.

What about if this history teacher was not a Comfort First person, but rather, a Freedom First person? In this case, she'd probably focus her lesson on how socially trapped most people felt back then, indebted to a lord, and unable to expect this to improve much during their lives. No freedom to travel. No freedom to chose a career. In fact, no choices at all in life, other than to submit to the whims of a lord.

What makes this focus important? Freedom first kids would be chomping at the bit to contribute their personal input. Freely and enthusiastically. They'd also be wanting to learn more about what it was like to live back then. And if they would have been able to find a way to be free.

And if the teacher was a Neatness First person? A Neatness First history teacher might focus her lesson on timelines and geographic boundary changes. Lists of political leaders, and charts of demographic data. And if her students were Neatness First kids, they would love this stuff. And eat up every handout. As well as competing with each other for the most organized notebook.

Finally, if our teacher was an Understanding First person, what would her lesson be like? In this case, our teacher would probably focus on the philosophical implications of the political changes. And look to stimulate her class by having them engage in rousing classroom discussions and passionate exchanges about the impersonal nature of the laws and times. Data? No biggie. Just enough to pass the exams. Neat notes. No real requirements. And classroom temperatures? She'd tolerate kids who asked, but only so as to get back to the rousing discussions.

The real focus then would be on "learning" the meaning of how people lived then. Understanding First kids would simply eat this up.

Closing Comments

So here we have it. Our first taste of the Emergence Personality Fractal. Are you beginning to see how much better things could be in classrooms? Imagine? Teacher's lessons tailored to the kids' personalities. More important, what I've begun to show you here occurs entirely as a function of whom the teacher and kids naturally are, and not because some statistical data head told them they should fit together.

Confused? Overwhelmed? Still skeptical or closed? Please hold onto your true feelings. You see, none of what I've just shown you will do you any good if you simply comply with it. To have it be useful, you'll have to reinvent these tests for yourselves. Literally. Otherwise all you'll be doing is simply parroting my work. And parroting is not allowed here. Why not? Because I've voiced this work from my Personality Fractal. You'll need to do the same.

What's next? Next week, we'll delve a bit further into these sample tests. Including something in this week's title; the words, "positively biased?" What does this phrase mean? And are there "negatively biased" tests as well?

We'll also look at what happens when someone's answers do not result in a three letter outcome. As well as what might be causing this little glitch.

And we'll also look further into how these nine simple questions could reveal such a significant portion of a person's personality.

In week's to come, we'll also help you to determine your own Personality Fractal. As well as those of the folks closest to you. Perhaps then, you'll see for yourself what an interesting thing this fractal is to know. And use.

Until next week then. I hope you're all well,

Steven


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