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The P Curve "Red Lines"

Mapping Changes in the Mind


 


The First Red Line: the "BLock Line"

If you now look at the diagram above, you will see there are two red lines, a thick one, called the "BLock Line," and a thin one, called the "P" Curve." First focus on the thick red line, the one I call the "BLock Line" which is the line that divides the page in half.

The "BLock Line" represents a point at which the person being guided ceases to be able to internally picture in some particular area of life, usually the one the guide and explorer are currently examining. This line then represents the point at which this person's ability to internally picture becomes "BLocked."

Next notice the two white arrows located on either side of the thick red "BLock" line. These two arrows title the two halves of the page, the left half being where the guide will document what an explorer can see and the right half being where the guide will document what this explorer cannot see.

In other words, on the part of the page to the left of the thick red line, the guide will record what the person was able to internally picture, and on the part of the page to the right of this line, the guide will record what the person was not able to internally picture.

As I stated previously, the whole point of dividing peoples' life experiences into these two piles of experience is that all wounds have a common symptom; that wherever a wound exists, the wounded person will have a significantly compromised ability to internally picture in that life area.

Thus, when the guide writes things to the left of the thick red line, he or she is documenting the things the explorer is able to picture, and these things represent the life areas in this person which are unBlocked or healthy. Please note, this includes all things regardless of whether the person suffers in this area or not. The idea here is, if you can see it, you are responding to the life event in a healthy way, regardless of whether you experience difficulty or not.

Obviously, this idea contradicts much of what is commonly believed, in that it is commonly believed that if it hurts, there is a wound. This idea is simply not true. Thus, the presence of pain does not prove there is any injury, in that some life experiences are simply supposed to be painful and this pain is health.

The converse idea then frames what is behind the other side of the line. Thus, when the guide writes things to the right of the thick red line, he or she is documenting the life areas in which this explorer is unable to picture, and these experiences represent the unhealthy or BLocked areas within this person, the person's actual wounds or injuries. The idea here is, if can not see it, you are responding in an unhealthy way to what you are experiencing, again, regardless of whether or not there is any suffering present.

Here, what is important to remember is that the absence of pain does not prove there is no injury. Again, this contradicts what many believe in that many believe a wound is healed when the pain is gone. Again, this is simply not true. Thus, many injuries lie silently waiting until provoked to the surface by a life event.

The Second Red Line: the "P" Curve

Now focus on the second red line, the thin red line which I call, the "P" Curve. This line represents the degree to which a person can internally picture during the particular kind of life events or scenes you are currently exploring.

First, look at the ends of this line, both of which are basically in the middle of the up - down range. This up down range represents the degree to which a person can internally picture from a full ability to picture at the top end, to a full inability too picture on the bottom end. And if you look closely, you will see that on the upper end of this line is written the phrase, "I see more."

This part of the line, then, literally represents exactly what it says; that here, the person has more and more ability to internally picture. Likewise, on the other end, where it says "I see less," it literally means the person has less and less ability to see.

Next notice that the "P" Curve line changes shape as it crosses the page, and that in the center of the page, near the top of the thick red BLock line, that the "P" Curve reaches a peak. What this peak represents is the actual point in time in any wounding experience at which the person gets injured.

Now notice the little red oval at this point on the "P" Curve. This oval is there to hold what ever the person was experiencing at this exact moment, the seemingly insignificant details each person records which will later be the "keys" to them reliving the experience. This oval, then, is kind of like a spy glass view of the last instant before the person ceased to be able to picture, the point at which this person's internal fuses blew and thus, the point at which the pain of the event caused the person to go into shock.

Please know that in reality, the shape of this thin red line will have little to do with the "P" Curve process other than to remind us that we are looking to divide the person's life experience into what can be seen and what can not be seen; in other words, into what is BLocked. As a side note, though, the shape of this line is one of the most important parts of the theory which underlies all Emergence as a Therapy, in that this shape as a measure of how much a person sees during a wounding event is the same for all people during wounding moments, regardless of how severe or mild their injuries may end up.

Again, please note that the point at which the thick red BLock line peaks is the point at which the actual BLock occurs.

Finally, note that on the diagram above (unlike on an actual "P" curve worksheet), the right side of the "P" Curve worksheet is grayed out. Normally this area is not grayed out but is here so as to more visually represent the state of shock into which all people go at this point during wounding events. Also, it visually reminds us that it is this shock which obscures the details on the right side of the event, and this is experienced as the inability to picture. More significant to remember, though, is the idea that it is this shock which prevents people from knowing where the actual wound is and so, where the healing must occur. Thus, it is this inability which causes wounded people to keep reliving the same painful outcomes over and over again regardless of how hard they try to heal and or change.

Introducing P Curves Stepping Thru the P Curve Process



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