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Scripted Life Event Diagrams

The Geometry of Wounding Events





the Geometry of Wounding Events

The "Geometry of Wounds"

Imagine you have been given a blank piece of paper and have been asked to draw a square on it. However, imagine you also have not yet learned the geometry of a "square."

Most therapists face a similar dilemma each time they begin therapy with someone. How so? No one teaches therapists the "geometry of wounds." In fact, not one school of therapy, other than Emergence, even attempts to formally define "wounds."

Is there such a thing as a way to formally define the "geometry of wounds?"

Yes, there is. In fact, one of more important differences between Emergence Therapy and other therapies is this geometry.

So what exactly does the geometry of a wound look like?

This article will briefly describe and define just this: the Geometry of Wounds.

the Geometry of Wounds Always Involves the Same Script

All wounds to the human psyche share a common origin script, a pattern of human events which, once experienced, permanently restricts and negatively charges peoples' responses to similar, future events.

What is this script?

A sequence of three experiences: [1] people become hyperaware, [2] they get startled, and [3] they go into shock.

What makes knowing this script so important is, most people believe "trauma" is the cause of wounds. In truth, though, people experience trauma in non wounding ways all the time. For instance, if a normal six year old boy is made to carry a heavy knapsack for longer than he can consciously manage, he will gradually become aware that the knapsack is too heavy to carry and will eventually have to put it down.

Did he experience a trauma?

In our sense of the word, yes. Thus, as we define the word, "trauma" is an "overwhelming experience."

Do overwhelming events injure? Not always. Why? Because while many experiences "overwhelm" people, most do not "shock" people.

Here, then, is what makes this script so important.

What makes this script so important is that most people believe it is trauma which wounds people. In truth, though, only traumatic events which startle wound people, and in fact, only traumatic events which startle people after first elevating their awareness wound people.

This distinction, between overwhelming events which do and do not injure, is one of the more important truths to grasp about human personality. With it, people can locate and heal wounds with great precision, similarly to how people who know what a square is can easily and effortlessly draw one.

the Geometry of Wounds Always Involves the Same Pattern of Changes in Time Perception

All people, during wounding events, experience the same pattern of changes in time perception. This pattern can be generally broken down into a sequence of five events:

[1] Normal time perception (time passes normally.)
[2] Quickening time perception (time speeds up.)
[3] Freezing time perception (time goes from quickly fluid to rapidly freezing.)
[4] Abruptly halted time perception (time becomes a fixed moment.)
[5] Absent time perception (time does not exist.)

Here again, what makes knowing this sequence so important is, people must experience these five perceptions in this order to get wounded. If they do not, they do not get wounded and at worst, simply suffer a passing discomfort.

What also makes this knowing this sequence important is, therapists can use their knowledge of this pattern to explore peoples' life events for wounding moments. More over, they can use this sequence to accurately differentiate between painful events which wound and painful events which pass.

Additionally, therapists can use their knowledge of this pattern to help people to heal wounds, by using experiential techniques to alter peoples' perceptions of time during their wounding events.

the Geometry of Wounds Always Involves the Same Pattern of Changes in Visual Consciousness

All people, during wounding events, experience the same pattern of changes in visual consciousness. This pattern can also be generally broken down into a sequence of five events:

[1] Normal visual consciousness (also known as the background awareness view.) Here, people see life at varying levels of average visual awareness.
[2] Hyper awareness (also known as the emergency scan view.) Here, people see life at a rapidly increasing level of visual awareness.)
[3] Startled (the freezing moment view.) Here, people get abruptly jolted into a rapidly freezing sense of visual awareness.
[4] Hypo-Awareness (the pirate's spy glass view.) Here, peoples' focus narrows to otherwise insignificant details.
[5] Blankness (the blank page view.) Here, people cease to be able to see the event on the screen of their mind.

Here too, what makes knowing this sequence so important is, people must experience these five changes in visual consciousness in this order to get wounded. If they do not, they do not get wounded and at worst, simply suffer a passing discomfort.

What also makes this knowing this sequence important is, therapists who recognize this sequence can use their knowledge of it to sift through peoples' life events for wounding events, accurately discerning between painful events which wound and painful events which pass.

Also, once wounds are uncovered, therapists can use their knowledge of this pattern of visual changes to help people to heal their wounds. How? By using experiential techniques to alter peoples' visual responses to the script of their wounding events

the Geometry of Wounds Always Involves the Same Pattern of Changes in Visual Intensity

All people, during wounding events, experience the same pattern of changes in visual intensity, and this pattern is probably the most important part of the geometry of wounds; the literal geometry. What I mean by this is that, if one were to plot the changes in visual intensity people experience during wounding events, what you would see is that the line which gets plotted always forms the same shape.

We call this shape, the "P" Curve.

Now, if you look back at the patterns we've previously listed, what you'll notice is, this curve, the "P" Curve, not only maps out the visual intensity of wounding events, it also accurately maps out the changes people experience in both time perception and visual consciousness. More over, by using one's knowledge of the geometry of this curve, therapists can sequentially place the behavioral and psychospiritual details which emerge during the therapy along this line and by doing so, reconstruct peoples' wounding events.

What does this accomplish?

For one thing, this enables therapists to accurately the finer details of peoples' wounds and in doing so, identifies what people need address in order to heal.

What are these finer details?

A "BLock," a "primary key" or keys, and a "secondary key" or keys. What are these things?

What is a "BLock?"

What is a "BLock?"

Let me start with why the word begins with two caps.

The word "BLock" began life as a short way to refer to a "being lock"; a life area in which people can not be themselves. More literally, a BLock is an area of life in which people can not visualize on the screen of their minds no matter how hard they try.

How common are these experiences?

As common as clouds. In fact, we all have them in quantities which once recognizable, make most people uncomfortable.

Is learning to recognize BLocks easy?

No. In fact, it's so hard most people find it difficult to believe these things even exist.

So what are they like?

Have you ever had to pose before a professional photographer for a wedding picture of a family photo?

If you have, in all likelihood, you have been temporarily blinded by the burst of light the flash makes.

What makes this example important is, most people who have experienced this event involuntarily wince when asked to even imagine a flash going off as their picture is being taken.

This inability to picture as otherwise ordinary life event is the BLock. In fact, this whole story is an accurate picture of what a wounding event is like and in fact, if you wince at the thought, you yourself have this wound.

What's the big deal?

Not much if the only BLock you get is from a flash bulb. Unfortunately, though, no one gets only one BLock. In fact, we all get hundreds, perhaps even thousands of BLocks. And while reacting in a preprogrammed way to seeing a flash camera is hardly a terrible injury, it would be if you were a photographer. How? Think about it. If the photographer winces at the thought of the flash, he or she must have their eyes closed as they take the picture. Hardly the best way for a photographer to work.

Worse yet, imagine a person who has been wounded in a car accident responds to driving? More specifically, say the last thing they saw was the red of the tail lights on the car in front of them. Now imagine this is what the person winces at, and that this person is driving behind you. Feel nervous?

This is what BLocks are. BLocks are preprogrammed visual distortions, some of them painfully charged and some charged with blankness. Which brings us to "keys."

What are "Keys?"

What are "keys?"

"Keys" are simply the slices of the wounding experience which have become negatively charged, and there are two kinds of "keys," "primary" and "secondary."

Primary keys are those slices of the wounding experience which originally startled the person. For instance, in the flash camera example, the blue dot on the bulb or the sudden explosion of blinding light.

Now, to expand a bit, "keys" are brief instants of wounding life experience wherein a person's visual scope has narrowed down to a small detail. In addition, this startling experience gets permanently associated to whatever the person sensed in this brief instant, either the physical sensations or the intuitive or both.

In this way, then, we can say that primary keys carry a negatively charge for the wounded person, and when later re experienced, the person involuntarily responds to in a negatively programmed way.

An example?

The silver metal bowl surrounding a flash bulb. Some people wince from just seeing these devices. This wince is peoples' response to the charge they experienced in the original event, the negative energy connected to the startling visual experience of the flash.

Now, rather than elaborate in words, allow me to present some actual wounding events, each a story otherwise told elsewhere on the site.



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