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The Information Line

Points of Interest


"Points of Interest" on the Information Continuum

Speaking of "knowing what things mean" (and because I try not to take myself too seriously), I often create playful scenes, or characters, which I can use to remind myself and others of what things mean. In this case, in an effort to help myself and others to remember what the Information Continuum means, I have created two characters.

I use these two characters to remind me of what people are like when they are in the states represented by the two theoretical extremes of this continuum; when they are consciously all the way to the left and when they consciously are all the way to the right. First, the left end.

When people are consciously all the way to the left of the Information Continuum, I call them, "heads with feet." Why? Because when people are in this state, they pretty much sense only the mental information present. By inference, then, this means they are basically unaware of any emotional information present.

What about when people are consciously on the right end of this continuum?

When people are represented by the right end of the Information Continuum, I call them, "hearts on wheels." Why? Because when people are in this state, they pretty much sense only the emotional information present. By inference, then, this means they are pretty much unaware of any mental information present.

Not surprisingly, in these two characters, we see the two states of being which most often cause humans to get in trouble. Why? Because human beings often mistake the lack of experience for proof something does not exist.

For example, people who sense no emotional component in a given situation may conclude "I must not feel much about this person, place, or thing. My feelings must not exist."

Likewise, people who sense no mental component to a situation may believe "I must be just making it up. What I am sensing must just be my imagination."

Thus, here is yet one more thing to be aware of about the Information Continuum: that it measures how much information we sense, but not necessarily how much information is present. And as I have already mentioned, since nothing in our lives can be fully expressed or experienced with just one of these two kinds of information, in order for us to be fully conscious of anything or anyone (to know the true nature of anything or anyone), we must be simultaneously aware of both the mental and emotional information present.

This experience, by the way, that of being simultaneously aware of both the mental and emotional information present, is represented by the exact middle point on the Information Continuum, and although I will not explain why as yet, I call people who are at this point, "innocent explorers."

What Makes These Three Points Important?

Why make such a fuss about the balance between these two kinds of information anyway, and what makes knowing about these points so important? What makes knowing about these points so important is that, if we know a person's current mix of information, we can tell whether this person is vulnerable to being wounded.

How exactly is the mix of the information we sense related to us getting wounded? To understand this, we need to know what makes people vulnerable to wounding in the first place, and to do this, we need to again go back to the three basics of the two that are one. These three basics are:

[1] that we exist simultaneously in two worlds (the physical and the spiritual) and in two bodies (in a physical body and in a spiritual body);

[2] that we inform ourselves and others that we exist in these two worlds and bodies by simultaneously expressing what we sense in two languages (thought, the language of the physical body, and emotion, the language of the spiritual body); and

[3] that everything in our lives has a nature far beyond the mere sum of their parts; that in essence, everything we experience is holistic (a two that are one.)

What I have yet to tell you, though, is that the fourth truth of the two that are one reveals how wounds and wounding are connected to consciousness. This fourth truth is:

[4] that wounds, regardless of the symptoms they produce, are simply injuries to our natural ability to be conscious.

What follows, then, is that, since all wounds are simply injuries to our natural ability to be conscious, and since being aware of the information we are sensing is the first aspect of consciousness, the only time we can be vulnerable to being wounded is when we are simultaneously aware of what we are sensing, in both worlds, and in both bodies. Why? Because even when we are not aware of it, we exist in both worlds and bodies simultaneously. In fact, experiencing this combination is the only way we ever experience the nature of anything or of anyone.

This means that, since wounds are injuries to our natures, in order for something to wound us, this something must affect us holistically or in other words, it must wound our physical and spiritual bodies, both, in the same instant.

Let me say this idea again, slowly.

[1] It is natural for us to always exist in both worlds and bodies simultaneously, and this is true whether we experience it or not.

[2] Our wounds are actually just injuries to our natural ability to sense this simultaneous state of being. In other words, our wounds are just injuries to our ability to experience the true nature of things consciously.

[3] Information (what we sense) is one of the three aspects of consciousness and as such, is one of the three things which gets injured in a wounding event. Further, since the nature of this information exists only when we sense both types simultaneously, the only time we can be wounded is when we are simultaneously aware of (simultaneously sensing) the information being generated in both worlds. In other words, the only time we can be wounded is when we are holistically aware of the information we are sensing.

The Holistic View

Is this view new? Not at all. Thus, despite the fact that most people define the word holistic to mean you do as many things separately as you need to do to heal and hope you cover all the bases, the true sense of the word holistic means that you honor both the body and the spirit in the same space and time. Incidentally, this second meaning is actually the essence of many generic forms of healing, including Shamanism. (No coincidence, I am a practicing Shaman.)

Shamanism aside, my point here is that, since it is our ability to stay holistically conscious which gets wounded, and since being aware that information exists is the first aspect of consciousness, we can be vulnerable to wounding only when we are holistically aware of the information we are experiencing. Further, since the Information Continuum shows us when we are holistically aware of the information present, we can use this continuum to know when we are vulnerable to being wounded.

At what point on the Information Continuum are we holistically aware of the information present? At the point at which we are simultaneously aware of an equal mix of both thought and emotion. Where is this point on the Information Continuum? At any point close to the middle of the line.

Is being holistically conscious of the information present the only thing which makes us vulnerable to being wounded? Actually, no. We also need to be holistically conscious of what this information means to us, and I will discuss this half of what makes us vulnerable to wounding when I discuss the Meaning Continuum.

What is important to note here is that we can not be wounded unless we are in the state represented by this middle point; also, that being at this middle point is one of only two criteria which need be present. Further, because we can see this point on the Information Continuum, we can use this line as a gauge to determine if we are vulnerable to wounding.

For now, what is important to remember is just that we can not be wounded unless we are in the state represented by this middle point on the Information Continuum.

What is equally important here, too, is that the inverse is also true. Thus, we can use this same criteria to determine if we are safe from wounding as well. How? Very simply, whenever we are NOT at this center point on the Information Continuum, we are safe from wounding. Why?

Because, since we never exist in only one world at a time, we can never be wounded in only one world at a time. Thus, whenever we are not sensing information holistically, we can not be wounded.

This, in fact, is why, when people experience danger, they become "heads with feet" or "hearts on wheels". Why?

Because whenever people are in either of these two states, meaning, whenever they are a significant distance away from being in the center of the Information Continuum, they are actually protected from further injury.

This, for example, is why a soldier or a surgeon becomes so cold (so mental) during a war or a medical emergency. They become "heads with feet" so they can do what they need to do and still be protected from injury. In other words, soldiers and surgeons, during these dangerous experiences must witness great violence. In order to be there and still be protected from injury, their internal autopilots automatically close off access to their emotional systems so as to protect them from personal injury.

Similarly, this is also why a person who is being raped or mugged may become hysterical. Anyone who has become a "hearts on wheels" is protected from further injury as well, as their internal autopilots have closed off access to their mental systems.

Lastly, while being in these two states protects people from further wounding, it is also important to remember that people can, at times, be jolted out of these safe states. How? If they experience a particularly powerful instant of violence. This is similar to the way a jolting slap can bring a hysterical person out of shock, only in the case of a hysterical person, the slap is meant to help.

Finally, let me summarize what I have presented in this section.

Most people, in stressful situations, will automatically find themselves in one of the two extremes present on the Information Continuum. Either they will find themselves being "heads with feet" (almost all mental) or "hearts on wheels" (almost all emotional.) Further, despite what many therapists would have us believe, the true reason these two states exist in the first place is that these two states of being actually serve a positive and loving purpose in our lives: in times of danger, they protect us from being wounded.

Said in other words, the purpose for these two states of being is that they protect people in times of danger. More over, entering these states is not a choice on the part of the person to avoid the situation. It is an entirely automatic response made by a protective mechanism which is built into all of us.

For all these reasons, at this point, I hope it has become obvious that being able to see when people are at these two points makes the Information Continuum an incredibly valuable tool.

Is sensing both of types of information simultaneously the only thing about information which makes us vulnerable to wounding, then? No. There are two other conditions related to information. Before discussing these two conditions, though, I need to talk more about another of our internal protective systems, what I call our "internal fuses."

In other words, I need to talk about what happens to us when we try to take in too much information.

The Information Continuum Menu

[1] the "Two That Are One"
[2] Zooming
[3] the Ocean Metaphor
[4] What is Information?
[5] Points of Interest
[6] How Information Wounds




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