Map of Change

Once Upon a Time, You Were Thin

All descriptions of consciousness derive from Herbart’s idea of a “limen.” In essence, a limen is a line between what you perceive and what you do not. Today this idea survives in our word “subliminal.” However, unlike most models of consciousness—wherein a single limen separates what we’re conscious of from the rest—in truth, our minds contain two limens. The first delineates what we’re conscious of from what is too big to take in fully; God, nature, life and death, most painful sensations. The second delineates what we’re conscious of from what is too small to take in fully; molecules, germs, atoms, and most insignificant sensations.

Inbetween these two limens lies what I call “the middle road,” the place in our minds wherein we perceive change in a more or less continuous manner. Conversely, outside of these two limens lies what I call “the outer road,” the place in our minds wherein we perceive change as intermittantly intruding, over or under-reactions. Related to eating, exercise, and weight loss, to be naturally thin you must walk the middle road naturally, not by sheer will. Indeed, it turns out will power is what puts us on the outer road. And makes us fat and unfit. Imagine? Will power is the demon. Who would have thought. And not, I'm not saying you need no will power, only that you need to use small amounts of will power to create big amounts of natural desire. This article will explain how.

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