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The Information Line

Variable 1 - Part One: the Two Worlds and Two Languages



chart of the Information Continuum

"The Information Continuum"

Part One: the Two Worlds and Two Languages

Of the three continuums which make up the Consciousness Metaphor, the Information Continuum is primary. Why? Because it is the from this continuum that the other two are derived. Therefore, I will begin my discussion with it. Before beginning, though, I would suggest you print out the accompanying diagram. I say this because the easiest way to learn a metaphor is to "connect a picture to the words," and if you print out this diagram, you can refer back to it to as you read.

As for understanding what the Information Continuum represents, a good place to start would be to visualize it as an ordinary water basin, one which has both hot and cold water flowing into it and some mix of hot and cold flowing out of it. Here, the cold water would represent the information our heads supply, and the hot water would represent the information our hearts supply.

Viewed as an "information" basin then, the Information Continuum could be seen as a horizontal pool of experience (a pool of "inform-ation") which extends from ALL COLD on the left (where "ALL COLD" represents ONLY mental information and NO emotional information) to ALL HOT on the right (where "ALL HOT" represents ONLY emotional information and NO mental information). At the center, of course, where there are equal amounts of both hot and cold, the information is a balanced mix of both mental and emotional information.

Some may already be wondering where the "physical" and "spiritual" information are located, and this is a good question. In fact, people often speak of the mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual aspects of life as if they were simply the four dimensions of our existence.

The Consciousness Metaphor uses a different approach. This approach begins with two assumptions:

[1] that every thing we experience, including ourselves, exists simultaneously in two places; in a physical world and in a spiritual world. This means we each exist simultaneously in two bodies; in a physical body and in a spiritual body.

[2] that while we exist in these two worlds and two bodies, we express what we experience there, simultaneously, in two languages. We express it in the language of thought (the kind of information the spiritual body senses), and we express it in the language of emotion (the kind of information the physical body senses).

The Two Worlds and The Two Languages

Notice I am using the words physical and spiritual to refer to the "worlds" and "bodies" and thought and emotion to refer to the "languages." Why make this distinction? Why not just treat these things as the four ways we view of our life experiences?

I use the words physical and spiritual to refer to the "worlds" and "bodies" because the words physical and spiritual refer to where we exist. In essence, these two words simply refer to the two "realms" we live in, both on the societal scale (as in the two worlds) and on the personal scale (as in the two bodies). Further, I call these two words "realms" because they each have their own completely different and yet, complementary set of natural laws (to see these laws explained, see my article entitled, The Six Concepts.)

The words thought and emotion, on the other hand, do not refer to where we exist but rather to what we sense about where we exist. Thus, I call these two words "languages" because together, these two words refer to the essence of everything we do to "inform" ourselves and others of what we have experienced. And like the two worlds and two bodies they inform us of, each language is unique, in that each informs us of what we experience in only one of the two worlds and in only one of the two bodies.

As for which is which, as I said, thought informs us of what our spiritual body has sensed (meaning, our mind's experiences of our world) and emotion informs us of what our physical body has sensed (meaning, our body's experiences of our world).

In this context, then, these two languages are the foundation of all we consciously experience, and the Information Continuum is just a way to visually describe this foundation, a way to visually represent how much of each language a person consciously experiences, internally and externally, in any given moment.

Dissecting this idea even further, the Information Continuum actually represents two things: [1] it represents how consciously we experience each of the two worlds and each of our two bodies, and [2] it represents the balance between these two experiences; whether we consciously sense one world more than the other or whether we sense them both equally.

Obviously, knowing how conscious we are of each of the two worlds can be very useful to us, but why mention the "balance" between the these two experiences? Before answering this question, I first need to talk about what I call, the two that are one.

The "Two That Are One"

What is the two that are one? The simplest way I can describe it is to say it is an essential part of the nature of all we experience. Am I saying this idea is the basis of all we experience? Of course not. However, like the fact that all organic life on our planet is carbon based, the two that are one is simply a fact which applies to everything we experience.

Now before I overwhelm you with the depth of this idea, let me just say, I raise this idea, here, merely to preface my discussion of the Information Continuum; nothing more. Thus, this discussion will focus on how the two that are one affects the way we experience information.

Let me begin by telling you a little about what led me to discover this concept. I discovered it after having what many people call a "near death" experience. And like most people who have near death experiences, afterwards, I struggled to understand what had happened to me. I especially tried to understand "where I went" during the experience. This search for "where I went" is what led me to discover the two that are one.

What exactly happened to me during this experience? To be honest, the specifics are unimportant and in fact, I have never really known whether what I saw literally happened or not. Admittedly, what I saw may have just been a product of my imagination; a dream of sorts. Then again, maybe it wasn't.

Either way, though, what affected me the most was not what I saw. It was the perspective from which I witnessed what I saw, the way I viewed everything I experienced. What I mean by this is that during the event, I felt as if I was seeing it from three different places at once. First, I felt as if I was seeing it through the eyes of a physical being without a spirit; in other words, as my physical self. Second, I felt as if I was seeing it through the eyes of a spiritual being without a physical body; in other words, as my spiritual self. And third, I felt as is I was seeing this event through the eyes of a third being, one for whom I have no name except to say, I felt like I was seeing this event through the eyes of a being who was watching from somewhere outside of the two worlds I know.

Admittedly, these few words do not really describe what this experience was like for me and in fact, I'm not sure there are words to describe it. However, if you would like to get some sense of what my experience was like, you can start by imagining you are sitting in a movie theater, watching a movie.

Now imagine you are seeing this movie as people normally see movies; as a single, continuous experience. At the same time, try to imagine you are also seeing the individual frames of this movie while it is running. Now, try to imagine you are also watching yourself seeing these two views. Finally, try to see all three views simultaneously.

Now before you think you have it, please know, when I say, "seeing," I do not mean simply that you are simultaneously aware these three views exist. I mean that you are consciously experiencing all three views in the same instant. No alternating visions allowed.

Did you find yourself alternating right from the start? If so, do not worry. There is nothing wrong with you. In fact, this alternating between views is simply our default behavior, a part of the way we are all designed. Thus, if you try this exercise, you, in all likelihood, will be unable to do anything but alternate. In fact, if you were to look closer, you would probably realize you had been alternating between the first view, which I call the "macro" life perspective (the larger, "continuous" view of the movie) and the second view, which I call the "micro" life perspective (the "individual frames" view of the movie).

Why am I so focused on getting you to see all three views at once? Because the only way to truly understand what the two that are one is, is to see all three views simultaneously and know you are doing it.

Now before you give up, let me just say, there are many times wherein ordinary people do stop alternating and experience what I call the "simultaneous life perspectives" state; the state wherein we experience the micro and macro views simultaneously. In fact, most of us spend a good portion of our first few years alive in this state but never know it. We also enter this state every time we learn holistically and every time we fall in love. More important, though, we also enter this state every time we get wounded, and every time we heal.

What prevents us from recognizing the unusual nature of these experiences?

For one thing, although we arrive on the planet in the simultaneous life perspectives state, the older we get, the less time we spend in this state and the more time we spend in the "alternating life perspectives" state; the state wherein we alternate between the micro and macro views. Eventually, then, we end up spending most of our time in the micro or "single frames" state.

Another way of stating this idea is to say that, in general, the older we get, the more we become biased toward the "small details" or emotional (physical world) side of life and away from the "big picture" or mental (spiritual world) side of life.

How does this bias affect us? Mainly, it biases how we learn. In fact, because of this bias, for most of our lives, we will get taught, and encouraged, to trust the mental information we experience (the micro, "single frames" view of life) over the emotional information we experience (over the macro, "big picture" view of life). Little wonder most of us trust and value hard facts over intuition.

Biases aside, my point here is, once we pass the age of three or four, we mainly experience life events as sequences of many little pictures (the micro view) with occasional glances at the "big picture" (the macro view).

As I said, I call this state, meaning, the state in which we spend most of our lives, the alternating life perspectives state. I also call it the "protected view" because while we are in this state, we can not be wounded. Unfortunately, though, while being in this state protects us from being wounded, it also prevents us from healing as well. (I'll offer more on this later.)

If people in the protected state cannot get wounded or heal, then in what state can they get wounded or heal? The simultaneous life perspectives state, meaning, the state in which we can see both the micro and macro views simultaneously. (Can you now begin to see why infants are so vulnerable? They spend most of their time in this state.)

Thus it is only while we are in the simultaneous life perspectives state that we can be wounded or be healed. For this reason, I also call this state, the "holistic" state. Why? Because, in a very real sense, being in the holistic state means we can see the "whole" view and can access the "whole" person. Moreover, being in this state, the one wherein life has this complete and whole access to us, is what makes us so vulnerable to wounding. It is also what makes us so accessible to healing.

The Table of Views

  • the "micro" view
  • (the "single frames," "scientific", or physical world side of life)
  • the "macro" view
  • (the "big picture," "spiritual," or spiritual world side of life)
  • the "alternating" life perspectives state
  • (the person alternates between the "micro" and "macro" views) Also called the "protected state," because only while people are in this state are they safe from wounding (they are protected).
    However, people in this state also can not heal.
  • the "simultaneous" life perspectives state
  • (the person sees both the "micro" and "macro" views simultaneously) Also called, the "holistic state," because only while people are in this state can they heal. Equally important, though, this is the only state in which people can be wounded.

Let me now briefly restate these ideas.

I call being in the alternating life perspectives state, being in the protected state, because while we are in this state, we are protected from being wounded. Unfortunately, we also can not heal while in this state.

On the other hand, I call being in the simultaneous life perspectives state, being in the holistic state, because this is the state in which we can heal. Unfortunately, this is also the state in which we become vulnerable to more wounding.

Do these ideas sound incredible? Of course they do. And admittedly, there is a lot to take in. But if you could just allow for the possibility that these two ideas might be true, then obviously these two ideas could be two of the more important to know about consciousness. Before talking about how these states allow and disallow healing, though, I first need to talk more about the alternating views perspective and about what I call, the "zooming."



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